Logan (2017) – Movie Review

logan

“Nature made me a freak. Man made me a weapon. And God made it last too long.” Logan (Hugh Jackman)

God is allowing us to enjoy the last in the X-Men /Wolverine cycle with Hugh Jackman having endured 17 years of pumping up to give adolescent males a reason to get up for the demands of an unforgiving world. However, this film, Logan, is not all blood and guts—it presents an aging hero coming to terms with the natural degeneration of his greatness and his legacy.

It’s really all about how these mutants, who clearly represent the fringes of society with odd residents marginalized by the homogeneity of the world. Inevitability hangs over this substantial hero saga, especially an iteration that suggests what even super heroes long for— immortality through lineage or enduring philosophy.

As the founder of the mutant school, Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart), tells it to Wolverine: “This is what life looks like: people love each other. You should take a moment . . . .” The film is suffused with a sense of the importance of family, not just Logan and his daughter, Laura (Dafne Keen), but also the new generation of mutants who must band together to survive.

The heroism turns on love rather than technology. The love is familial, in this case Logan discovering his daughter then sacrificing his safety to escort her to Eden, a place with other child mutants, who must hide from the dark forces bent on using them as soldiers. Although such bonding is the stuff of cliché, this film makes the growing love and sacrifice believable.

In the end, the search has been to discover what it’s like to live and love normally. Albeit briefly. Amidst the sturm and drang of violent, bloody super hero films, and this one has as much violence as any other, the discovery of homely love is the greatest adventure of all.

 

10 out of 10 stars

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Dom Hemingway (2013) – Movie Review

Richard Shepherd’s latest film is a maelstrom of bad behaviour in the best style of British crime comedies – it’s impossible to not liken it to Guy Ritchie and his ilk – but this one stands out from the crowd as it features a stunning performance from Jude Law – he may have started his career with man in touch with his feminine qualities but here he is the full monty as the mockney gangster on steroids. Law cannot be accused of a lack of a commitment – he throws himself in with palpable relish – and shouts and swears his way in a remarkably winning performance. Subtle it ain’t – but man it is genuinely entertaining, pure and simple.

The lasting impression is the tremendous energy of the script and Jude Law – it could really be a stage play in places – it is not often these days that movies create energy through an excellent script, rather than energy by effects – this does.

No way is this a great film – but Jude Law’s performance is full of sly humour, and Richard E Grant obviously loved being the dry sidekick – there is more than a touch of Withnail to the whole proceedings and he is superb.

Dom Hemingway avoids squeamish violence in the main and goes for the jugular in its script instead – it even has more than a touch of pathos admid the insanity. All in all, if you like films with some style, real laughs, and energy – and crude craziness – then this fits the bill better than most.

 

7 out of 10 stars

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